Music as an aesthetic experience

Artistic formalism has been taken to follow from both the immediacy and the disinterest theses Binkley—; Carroll20— If you take the immediacy thesis to imply the artistic irrelevance of all properties whose grasping requires the use of reason, and you include representational properties in that class, then you are apt to think that the immediacy thesis implies artistic formalism. If you take the disinterest thesis to imply the artistic irrelevance of all properties capable of practical import, and you include representational properties in that class, then you are apt to think that the disinterest thesis implies artistic formalism.

Music as an aesthetic experience

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind.

Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: In a proposed model, two parallel levels of aesthetic information processing are proposed. On the first level two sub-levels of narrative are processed, story theme and symbolism deeper meanings.

The second level includes two sub-levels, perceptual associations implicit meanings of object's physical features and detection of compositional regularities.

Two sub-levels are defined as crucial for aesthetic experience, appraisal of symbolism and compositional regularities. These sub-levels require some specific cognitive and personality dispositions, such as expertise, creative thinking, and openness to experience. Finally, feedback of emotional processing is included in our model: Introduction Aesthetic experience is one of the most Music as an aesthetic experience but also one of the vaguest and most poorly specified concepts in the psychology of art and experimental aesthetics.

The purpose of the present paper is to provide a more explicit definition of this phenomenon and to propose a tentative model of underlying motivational, cognitive, and emotional processes and dispositions.

Generally, aesthetic experience can be defined as a special state of mind that is qualitatively different from the everyday experience. According to Cupchik and Winstonaesthetic experience is a psychological process in which the attention is focused on the object while all other objects, events, and everyday concerns are suppressed.

In both definitions, aesthetic situations and objects of aesthetic interest are specified as fundamentally different from everyday situations and objects of everyday use. Perhaps the best example of this contrast is Picasso's famous Bull's Head, an artistic construction made of a bicycle seat and handlebars.

Seen from the everyday pragmatic perspective, the handlebars and the seat are experienced as parts of a bicycle with specific functions for seating and governing. Also, as with all other objects of everyday use, they can be judged as more or less beautiful, elegant, well designed, and the like.

However, only when they lose their everyday pragmatic meaning as bicycle parts and transcend into the new symbolic level of reality combination into a new whole, a bull's headdoes the aesthetic experience emerge.

According to Apter the distinctive feature of aesthetic experience is that it is not goal directed ie, pragmaticbut focused more upon the activity itself ie, self-rewarding. In their neuroimaging studies Cupchik and collaborators Cupchik et al have shown that distinct cortical areas were activated when the observers were oriented to the pragmatic and aesthetic aspects of the same paintings.

They found that pragmatic orientation was associated with the higher activation of the right fusiform gyrus this area was associated with the perception of specific categories of objects, including faces; cf Kanwisher et al ; Martin et al ; McCarthy et alwhereas the aesthetic orientation corresponded to a higher activation of the left and right insula these areas were involved in emotional experience; cf Paradiso et al ; Teasdale et al ; Lane et al and left lateral pre-frontal cortex this area plays a role in the cognitive control and the higher-order self-referential processes; cf Burgess et al In our opinion aesthetic experience does not belong to the same class of phenomena as aesthetic preference, liking, the judgment of beauty, and so on.

Unlike aesthetic experience, which is an exceptional state of mind, liking and the judgment of beauty belong to the domain of everyday experience with everyday objects eg, human faces, bodies, clothing, buildings, etc. Namely, in aesthetic experience the object of beauty is not seen as a tool for the satisfaction of bodily needs eg, appetitive and mating functions; cf Ramachandran and Hirsteinbut rather as a provocation of the higher level pleasures, such as pleasures of the mind cf Kubovy In other words, to be a part of an aesthetic experience, beauty must transcend from its extrinsic pragmatic to intrinsic aesthetic values—that is, a beautiful object must become an object of beauty.

According to this, even ugly things can elicit aesthetic experience eg, aesthetic fascination with deformation, monstrous, grotesque, morbid, horrible, and other kinds of ugliness; cf Eco In order to specify the distinctive characteristics of aesthetic experience, it will be useful to consider other similar phenomena of the exceptional or transcendental states of mind.

In the following paragraphs these phenomena will be shortly presented. Flow is defined as an effortless mental energy flow caused by the awareness of congruence between incoming information and our goals.

Music as an aesthetic experience

During this state of mind people are intensively immersed in what they are doing, with strong involvement in the process of the activity. Aesthetic experience is also closely related to Maslow's concept of peak experience Maslow In peak experiences, attention is fully engaged and focused on a particular object, while the object is seen as detached from its everyday purpose and usefulness.

Like in the state of flow, the person is self-transcending, self-forgetful, and disoriented in time and space.The introduction of Donald J. Funes' book Musical Involvement addresses the topic of music as an aesthetic experience. The preface to the introduction is the realization that truly listening to music requires an active response, and this type of listening is not innate.4/4(1).

An aesthetic experience as a consummatory phase of experience which is valuable in itself is, therefore, an irreducibly contextual notion.

The logical connection between the individual and subjective aesthetic experience and external objective practices goes to the concept of meaning. The differences between music as an occasion for aesthetic experience and music as human, social praxis, and the differences, in turn, between aesthetic education and music education are not just noteworthy, but potentially profound.

Jan 12,  · In this paper aesthetic experience is defined as an experience qualitatively different from everyday experience and similar to other exceptional states of mind. Three crucial characteristics of aesthetic experience are discussed: fascination with an aesthetic object (high arousal and attention.

The introduction of Donald J. Funes’ book Musical Involvement addresses the topic of music as an aesthetic experience. The preface to the introduction is the realization that truly listening to music requires an active response, and this type of listening is not innate.

music education in terms of the concept of aesthetic experience. They seem to take Reimer’s definition of it at face value, and because it really is a very narrow.

Visual Arts, Music, and Aesthetic Experience - Sociology - Oxford Bibliographies